How to Grip a Golf Club: The 3 Most Common Techniques

Sep 13, 2023
how to grip a golf club

Learn all the swing techniques in the world, but without a proper golf grip to begin with, it’s like building a house without a solid foundation. Just as a strong base is essential for a sturdy home, a proper grip is the foundation of a successful golf swing. This article will teach you how to grip a golf club correctly by detailing three of the most commonly used techniques.

The 3 Types of Golf Grips

Three grips dominate the golf world and each have their own unique advantages. From just starting out to spending time on tour, let’s take a look at each grip and how it might benefit your game. Please note that the pointers given below are for a right-handed golfer. If you are a left-handed golfer, simply reverse the instructions.

Ten-Finger Grip

(Credit: Adobe Stock)

The ten-finger grip is a common one used amongst beginners, but has found its way into the game of some notable professionals from time to time, including Bubba Watson and Scott Piercy. Sometimes referred to as a baseball grip, it involves placing all ten fingers on the club handle with your dominant hand (right for a right-handed golfer) stacked under your non-dominant one.

How to Hold the Ten-Finger Grip

  • Align the clubface behind the ball, ensuring it's square to the target.
  • Place the club's handle diagonally across the fingers of your left hand.
  • The handle should run from the base of your pinky to the middle of your index finger.
  • Keep your left thumb on top of the grip, pointing down the shaft.
  • Bring your right hand to the club, positioning it below the left hand.
  • Your right hand should also hold the club's handle diagonally across your fingers.
  • A V will form between your right thumb and index finger that should point towards your right shoulder.
  • The right palm rests on top of the left thumb.
  • Hold the club with a firm yet relaxed grip, allowing your wrists to remain flexible.

The ten-finger grip may require some experimentation to find the right level of comfort and balance, but is a great beginner grip for anyone just starting out in the game of golf. 

Overlapping Grip

(Credit: Adobe Stock)

The overlapping grip is the most common one you’ll see on course. It encourages a square club face and emphasizes control with a balanced mix of power. It has a natural feel that is comfortable and versatile to any style of play. It’s similar to the ten-finger grip, but with just a bit more overlap between the dominant and non-dominant hand.

How to Hold the Overlapping Grip

  • Align the clubface behind the ball, keeping it square.
  • Place the club's handle diagonally across the fingers of your left hand.
  • Similar to the ten-finger grip, the handle should run from the base of your pinky to the middle of your index finger.
  • Position your right hand below your left hand on the club.
  • The pinky finger of the right hand overlaps the index finger of the left hand.
  • The right palm rests on top of the left thumb.
  • Ensure that the clubface is square to the target in the address/starting position.
  • Hold the club with a firm yet relaxed grip, allowing your wrists to remain flexible.

Spend time on the driving range to become comfortable with the overlapping grip. Experiment with different grip pressures and positions to find the right feel for your swing.

Interlocking Grip

(Credit: Adobe Stock)

The interlocking grip is another common grip style, where the pinky finger of the left hand is interlocked with the index finger of the right hand. The extra tension and connection between each hand offers a more stable grip on the club. It’s often used in players’ short games, and has been spotted being used by players like Tiger Woods and John Daly.

How to Hold the Interlocking Grip

  • Position the club so that it's square to the target.
  • Place the club's handle diagonally across the fingers of your left hand.
  • The handle should run from the base of your pinky to the middle of your index finger, similar to the other two grips.
  • Bring your right hand to the club, positioning it below the left hand.
  • Interlock the pinky finger of your right hand with the index finger of your left hand.
  • The right palm rests on top of the left thumb.
  • Hold the club with a firm yet relaxed grip that is positioned towards the target line; keep your wrists flexible.

The interlocking grip can take a bit to get used to, but once it starts to feel natural, you will be able to reap the benefits from its unique tension and stability.

Which One Should You Use?

(Credit: Adobe Stock)

Your safest bet is the overlapping grip in terms of universality when it comes to shots at all distances and with all club types. However, it will take some experimentation in your play to see what grip might benefit you, and when. An experienced player will often become acquainted with each one to see how it might serve them best when a particular shot comes into play. 

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 Written by Eric Lister – Certified Personal Trainer & Corrective Exercise Specialist

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